photoSEOUL/LONDON – May 26, 2016 – A new report published today by the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) in partnership with the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED), and the Green Economy Coalition (GEC) calls on development stakeholders to pursue environmentally sustainable, economic growth that is pro-poor and socially inclusive.

Though development agendas emphasize the importance of achieving economic growth that maintains environmental sustainability, policies that effectively address poverty and social exclusion also need to be prioritized and implemented.

“Growth, even if it is green, cannot be sustainable unless it adequately addresses poverty and social exclusion in an integrated and systemic way,” said Inhee Chung, Senior Sustainability and Safeguards Specialist, GGGI. “Green growth can only lead to transformative and sustainable change if it is pro-poor and delivers benefits to the most marginalized and vulnerable social groups.”

The publication of the Pro-Poor, Inclusive Green Growth: Experience and a New Agenda (link) report aims to support decision makers develop and implement policies that simultaneously achieve economic growth, environmental sustainability, poverty reduction and social inclusion.

The report demonstrates how green growth can address some of the drivers of poverty and social exclusion, and stresses the importance of strengthening institutional and governance structures in order for green growth strategies to be effective and respond to people’s needs.

“While progress toward greener and more inclusive growth has been achieved, delivering the benefits of green growth at scale and to all stakeholders has been hampered by weak governance structures, policy incoherence and institutional silos,” said Steve Bass, Senior Associate, IIED. “To overcome these challenges and deliver at scale stakeholders such as poor, vulnerable social groups and small, informal businesses must be included.”

GraphTo enhance inclusion and deliver pro-poor, green growth the report puts forth policy options and recommendations to produce outcomes that: enable governance frameworks that are inclusive, integrated and transformative; empower poor women and men through enhanced livelihoods, rights and capital assets; make green options accessible through inclusive financing mechanisms; deliver metrics for inclusive green growth that reinforce target outcomes in planning and monitoring.

To further discussion and generate buy-in for green growth that reduces poverty and is socially inclusive, GGGI, IIED and GEC will present the report findings at the Poverty Environment Partnership meeting in Dhaka, Bangladesh on May 31, 2016.

The Green Growth Knowledge Platform will also organize a webinar on June 8, engaging the report authors and online participants in discussion on ways to make pro-poor, inclusive green growth a reality.

Read the full report here.

About GGGI

Based in Seoul, GGGI is an intergovernmental organization founded to support and promote green growth. The organization partners with countries to help them build economies that grow strongly, are more efficient and sustainable in the use of natural resources, less carbon intensive, and more resilient to climate change. GGGI works with countries around the world, building their capacity and working collaboratively on green growth policies that can impact the lives of millions. To learn more about GGGI, see http://www.gggi.org and visit us on Facebook and Twitter.

About IIED

The International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED) is a policy and action research organization. We promote sustainable development to improve livelihoods and protect the environments on which these livelihoods are built. We specialize in linking local priorities to global challenges. IIED is based in London and works in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Middle East and the Pacific, with some of the world’s most vulnerable people. We work with them to strengthen their voice in the decision-making arenas that affect them — from village councils to  international conventions. www.iied.org

About GEC

Established in 2009, the Green Economy Coalition (GEC) is the world’s only civil society-led multi-stakeholder group working together on green economy. The GEC is made up of think-tanks, environmental and development NGOs, trade unions, businesses, campaign organizations and UN bodies. The GEC vision is one of resilient economies that provide a better quality of life for all within the ecological limits of the planet. The GEC mission is to accelerate the transition to these new green economies. www.greeneconomycoalition.org

 

Contact Information

Mr. Thomas Nielsen

Poverty and Social Inclusion Adviser

GGGI

M: +82 10 9530 9960

E: Thomas.Nielsen@gggi.org

 

Mr. Steve Bass

Senior Associate

IIED

E: steve.bass@iied.org

 

Emily Benson

GEC

Programme Manager

E: emily.benson@greeneconomycoalition.org

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Green growth initiatives to date have often placed the economy and environment front and center. However, for green growth to fulfill its promise, it needs to also focus on people and address systemic causes of poverty and social exclusion. Green growth that does not deliver benefits to all stakeholders will not lead to the kind of transformative change envisioned by the global community and outlined in the Sustainable Development Goals.

The Pro Poor, Inclusive Green Growth report demonstrates how green growth can address some of the drivers of poverty and social exclusion. Published by the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) in association with the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED) and the Green Economy Coalition (GEC), the report stresses that to be effective green growth strategies will need to strengthen institutional and governance structures and respond to people’s needs. Drawing from a number of case studies the publication provides practical steps for policymakers, business and civil society to work together to deliver inclusive green growth.

Covering over forty years of sustainable development, the report highlights progress that has been made toward greener and more inclusive growth, while drawing attention to scale limitations as a result of weak governance structures, policy incoherence and institutional silos. The report documents how poor groups and small or informal businesses often lack the power, access or agency to shape policy or business outcomes.

This is of critical importance because the informal economy is much larger than the formal economy in many developing countries, and the starting point for most poor groups. Therefore, if the benefits of green growth are to be shared and take hold at scale, these often excluded stakeholders need to ‘own’ and participate in inclusive green growth that is specific to their own experiences.

To achieve this and deliver pro-poor, inclusive green growth, the Report recommends that focus be placed on four key policy outcomes:

  • Governance that is inclusive, integrated and transformative – founded on new and better linked institutions
  • Empowerment of poor women and men – strengthening their livelihoods, rights and capital assets
  • Inclusive finance mechanisms – making green options accessible to small/informal business
  • Metrics for inclusive green growth – reinforcing desirable outcomes in planning and monitoring

The report also offers guidance on inclusive processes that deliver green growth outcomes. This begins with an assessment of the current status of outcomes, and the drivers and barriers of past efforts. Decision makers should then bring together social and business groups and authorities to explore the opportunities and challenges of different approaches, and to build consensus and a collective vision. Once plans have been developed and assessed, particularly for their distributional aspects, poor and marginalized groups must then be included in the implementation process.

A valuable tool for policymakers and development practitioners, the report will provide users with applicable lessons learned and approaches to help ensure that green growth engages and benefits all stakeholders.

Read the full report here.

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The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) provide an important aspirational global framework for international development and cooperation efforts over the next 15 years. With our in-country presence and unique position as an independent, trusted advisors to governments, GGGI is well-placed to respond to the needs of Member countries to put in place the necessary policy, capacity and financing architecture to deliver on the Paris Agreement.

resizedKIGALI, RWANDA – May 10, 2016 – The Government of Rwanda in partnership with the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) today launched the National Road Map for Green Secondary Cities Development in Rwanda, on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum (WEF) on Africa event in Kigali.

The National Roadmap will support Rwanda’s Green Growth and Climate Resilient Strategy and serve as an implementation tool for the country’s Economic Development and Poverty Reduction Strategy (EDPRS2).

Today’s launch event was attended by His Excellency James Musoni, Rwanda’s Minister of Infrastructure, Dr. Chanho Park, GGGI’s Director of Programs, mayors from the six secondary cities of Muhanga, Rubavu, Nyagatare, Huye, Rusizi and Musanze, as well as development partners and other distinguished guests.

The launch event included a panel discussion titled, “The Way Forward on the Green Urbanization of Secondary Cities in Rwanda”, which generated panelist ideas and positions on developing cities as economic and social development centers.

The Government of Rwanda’s Vision 2020 has set a goal to grow the country’s urban population from the current 17% to 35% over the next 4 years.  In this context, the National Roadmap will provide key actions and practical planning guidance to policy makers  working to transform the six secondary cities into poles of economic development.

“The Roadmap provides simple but tangible actions to facilitate our quest to transition to a ‘green economy’ approach to economic transformation,” said H.E. James Musoni, Minister of Infrastructure.  “The development of Rwanda’s secondary cities as poles of economic growth with balanced development opportunities will enable sustainable livelihood and poverty reduction.”

GGGI has supported these efforts since 2012, through its partnership with the Rwanda’s National Fund for Environment and Climate Change (FONERWA), and work to develop the country’s green growth and climate resilient green cities.

“The National Roadmap is the result of continuous collaboration with stakeholders, which will help ensure that Rwanda’s growing urban populations benefit from green and sustainable city development,” said Dr. Chanho Park, GGGI Director of Programs.

With the launch of the National Roadmap complete, GGGI and its Rwandan partners will begin building necessary capacity to support implementation, and prioritize actions that will develop into   investment plans and bankable projects.

About GGGI

Based in Seoul, GGGI is an intergovernmental organization founded to support and promote green growth. The organization partners with countries to help them build economies that grow strongly, are more efficient and sustainable in the use of natural resources, less carbon intensive, and more resilient to climate change. GGGI works with countries around the world, building their capacity and working collaboratively on green growth policies that can impact the lives of millions. To learn more about GGGI, see http://www.gggi.org and visit us on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Contact Details:

Mr. Okey Daniel Ogbonnaya

Regional Coordination Officer, Africa and Middle East

Global Green Growth Institute

M: +82 10 9530 8815

 

Mr. Darren Karjama

Head of Communications

Global Green Growth Institute

T: +82 70 7117 9966

M: +82 10 9530 9995

E: darren.karjama@gggi.org