Palm of Official Selection

Palm of Official Selection

SEOUL – June 26, 2017 – The Deauville Green Awards international film festival, dedicated to promoting information shorts and documentaries advocating sustainability, eco-innovations and social responsibility, has awarded a Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) Stories of Change film the Palm of Official Selection.

The film, Transition to Green Development, documents Mongolia’s efforts to tackle air pollution and shift to a green growth model backstopped by renewable energy and energy efficient infrastructure.  GGGI has been working with the Government of Mongolia since 2011, to transition from resource-intensive development and implement green growth.

The Mongolia Stories of Change film has been selected from the over 300 entries as a Deauville Green Awards finalist under the Energy Transition category, which includes films highlighting efforts to sustainably manage resources through renewable resources.  The film will be screened on June 27 and 28 during the festival in Deauville, France.

Click to on image to watch the film

Click on image to watch the film

“Communicating the human anecdotal impact of our organization’s work is often challenging. With our ‘Stories of Change’ series, we continue to travel deep into the field to illustrate how GGGI’s policy and investment work translates into improved climate resilience for citizens all over the developing world.” noted Darren Karjama, the Head of Communications at GGGI, and the Executive Producer for the Mongolia Stories of Change film.

He added “We’re honored to have this film be recognized by the Deauville Green Awards Film Festival, but we’re also eager to see the work of others being recognized by the organizers. It is a great initiative and the focus on communicating potential for sustainability intervention narratives is critically important.”

The Mongolia Transition to Green Development film is the seventh in GGGI’s Stories of Change series, which includes films documenting GGGI’s work in Colombia, Ethiopia, Jordan, the Philippines, Rwanda and the UAE.

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The 6th Deauville Green Awards festival will bring together stakeholder from the World Bank, BBC, French Ministry of Culture and Communication, IDF Film Commission, Deutsche Welle, Enedis, Euronews, RTÉ, NHK, National Parks, ITV, World Television, Radio Canada, YLE Finland, Sveriges Television, Ushuaia, GGGI, WWF, inno-vative start-ups and numerous journalists, producers, directors and agencies.

About the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI)

Based in Seoul, GGGI is a treaty-based international, inter-governmental organization founded to support and promote green growth. The organization partners with countries to help them build economies that grow strongly, are more efficient and sustainable in the use of natural resources, less carbon intensive, and more resilient to climate change. GGGI works with countries around the world, building their capacity and working collaboratively on green growth policies that can impact the lives of millions. To learn more about GGGI, see http://www.gggi.org and visit us on Facebook and Twitter.

 This article was published on June 20 by PACNEWS  

 

Vanuatu’s capital, Port Vila, located on the island of Efate, is using solar power for tourism, commercial, and government activities. But, in rural areas, solar capacity is limited. Photo Credit: GGGI

Vanuatu’s capital, Port Vila, located on the island of Efate, is using solar power for tourism, commercial, and government activities. But, in rural areas, solar capacity is limited.
Photo Credit: GGGI

 An archipelago of 83 volcanic islands, 65 of which are inhabited, Vanuatu is one of the most culturally rich places on Earth: over 100 indigenous languages are still spoken across the islands.  With a population of approximately 290,000, 75% of people live predominantly in rural areas and depend on the abundant natural resources and surrounding environment for their livelihoods. However, given its geographic distance from major markets, lack of infrastructure, and vulnerability to climate impacts, Vanuatu faces a number of unique development challenges.

Supported by the traditional agriculture and fishing sectors, and, increasingly, the rapidly growing tourism industry, Vanuatu’s economy has experienced strong growth in recent years. However, a significant challenge affecting several aspects of the country’s development is energy insecurity. Vanuatu is still highly dependent on imported fossil fuels, and, in combination with high electricity costs and low access to electricity in many rural areas, the need to create stable, secure, and sustainable energy systems for Vanuatu’s islands remains a major concern. Specifically, a significant gap exists in electricity access between urban and rural areas across the islands. An estimated 30% of households and public institutions have access to electricity via connections to a grid network, yet only four islands benefit from the grid. In off-grid rural areas, only 54% of public institutions and 9% of households have access to electricity.

To tackle this challenge and bring energy security to all of Vanuatu’s communities, the Government of Vanuatu (GoV) is working closely with the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) to create new plans for green, inclusive and resilient energy. In collaboration with the World Bank, GGGI has helped the Department of Energy (DoE) to update the National Energy Road Map (NERM), which was endorsed by the government in June 2016. The NERM highlights Vanuatu’s vision for 100% electricity access and 100% renewable energy by 2030, and includes new energy efficiency targets and a new priority area: green growth. By adopting a green growth approach, the NERM explicitly links Vanuatu’s economic growth with opportunities in the energy sector. As Antony Garae, Director of the Department of Energy, notes, “We are mainstreaming energy with other factors in the economy. GGGI has the same holistic approach as us, and sees clean energy as a catalyst for economic growth.”

Specifically, GGGI is helping the GoV create systems that enable the 100% electricity access and 100% renewable energy targets to be reached by 2030, including assisting with the development and implementation of the new National Green Energy Fund (NGEF). At the same time, GGGI is focusing on how clean energy can help the rural tourism industry contribute directly to green growth and poverty reduction.

 

A National Green Energy Fund to spark renewable energy investment

In addition to supporting the GoV to put in place robust policies to catalyze renewable energy growth, GGGI is also helping to make capital more readily available for household electrification and productive uses through the NGEF. This finance mechanism will allow local people and organizations to invest in clean energy that suits their economic needs. Ultimately, the fund will improve access to clean energy, promote renewable energy, and improve energy efficiency while, at the same time, creating transformative opportunities for rural communities. By working directly with other ministries and, importantly, across sectors such as fisheries, tourism, agriculture and water, GGGI is supporting the GoV to develop the framework and mechanisms to operationalize the NGEF by the end of 2017.

How Vanuatu’s NGEF assists in implementing green growth across the economy.

How Vanuatu’s NGEF assists in implementing green growth across the economy.

 

Lighting Vanuatu’s rural communities with green energy

A predominant focus in the government’s energy plan is to bring energy security to Vanuatu’s rural areas, while also providing economic, environmental and community benefits.  For example, in partnership with the government, GGGI is building on the work of other donors, such as the World Bank’s ‘Plug and Play’ small-scale remote solar systems. Responding to the demand for bigger solar systems (i.e. more than 5-35w per household) to power fridges, solar water pumps, and other equipment, GGGI is exploring mechanisms that will enable local businesses, such as shops and microenterprises, to sell more solar systems. These systems have economic multiplier effects and provide direct benefits to local people. As Paul Kaun, Green Growth Specialist at GGGI, notes, “with a solar water pump, for example, women who struggle to get water from the river and carry it back would be able to use a tap to get water instead. This is a life changing service, and I’m proud to be part of this transformation.”

At the same time, solar electricity would allow farmers to store, package, and sell their food in new markets. While rural areas provide most of Vanuatu’s food production, due to low electricity access, keeping perishables fresh when distant from market centers is difficult. This has an especially important impact for women, as Mrs. Leias Colwick, CEO of the Vanuatu National Council of Women highlights, “the men come and go, but the bulk of the hard work is done by women in the communities. This clean energy can help lower their burden. With a 150w solar system, they can have a vacuum sealing bag machine, which preserves the food they grow, and improves their opportunities. This is the starting point for unburdening women.”

 

A woman on the island of Efate fills up a water container with the help of a solar pump.   Photo credit: GGGI

A woman on the island of Efate fills up a water container with the help of a solar pump.
Photo credit: GGGI

Benefits for rural electrification go beyond economics and include health (for example, improving maternal health by providing services within the village) and education (for example, powering laptops, providing access to the Internet and information, and online courses). “Access and effective and productive use of energy increases income and, therefore, people can afford to pay for their connection to electricity and information,” adds Mr. Kaun. This establishes a positive feedback cycle; people experience better energy access, and, so, can create better incomes with better information, and can then afford to buy more power. Clean energy becomes the catalyst for sustainable economic development and poverty reduction.

Despite the barriers that exist, such as accessing the money to fund electrification, and the operations and maintenance required to ensure sustainability of the systems, GGGI and the government are confident that a green growth approach to development will provide the pathway to 100% electricity access through renewable energy. By adopting this approach, systems will be in place to both effectively support community development and enable a thriving economy. “We see inclusive green growth as a game changer”, says Mr. Garae. “It will change the lives of the people, children will have access to education, and women in the villages will have more choices for their livelihoods.”

 

Rural electrification for clean, green and inclusive tourism

In line with delivering inclusive green energy, GGGI’s work with the GoV is also exploring renewable energy as a catalyst for growth in other sectors such as tourism. With the tourism industry contributing approximately 50% of Vanuatu’s economy, the country is highly appealing to tourists seeking cultural richness and stunning landscapes. However, drawing vacationers and the economic benefits they provide to Vanuatu’s remote areas remains a challenge. With basic services such as reliable electricity unavailable in many places, it is difficult to encourage tourists, and their dollars, to travel off the beaten path.

According to the Vanuatu Statistic Office,  only 29% of visitors arriving by air in June 2016 visited the outer islands. A significant issue is the lack of secure energy and other basic tourism services such as Internet access and transport. Many of the remote islands’ tourism bungalows rely on petrol generation sets, which only provide a few hours of electricity each day. Without a steady electricity supply, tourism operators cannot provide the comforts that international tourists demand, or even complete the simple task of securing bookings, and are missing out on the opportunity to improve their livelihoods.

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However, with the support of GGGI, the GoV is developing a new plan to provide clean and secure energy to the more remote, family-run tourist bungalows, bringing long-awaited benefits to distant islands. GGGI is working in close collaboration with the Department of Energy and Department of Tourism to develop a partnership that will provide renewable energy to grassroots tourism operators. This initiative also aligns with the government’s NERM, which seeks to improve affordability and access to energy for tourism businesses. Under the roadmap, 25% of rural tourism bungalows will use renewable forms of electricity by 2020, and 65% by 2030.

Through an in-depth study, GGGI is exploring how solar energy and energy efficiency technologies could support small-scale rural tourism operators under an eco-tourism framework, creating economic, social and environmental benefits. The initiative would improve tourism services and revenues, and provide local employment opportunities, while also helping to develop the sector in a sustainable way.

In addition to reducing greenhouse gases, the plan will assist small operators in minimizing their reliance on imported fuel, creating more stable energy costs, a reliable supply, and supporting business planning into the future. Yet, improving Vanuatu’s tourism opportunities is not only about energy security; effective marketing to highlight this clean, green approach is needed to fully capitalize on the investments. Mr. Jerry Spooner, Principal Accreditation Officer at the Department of Tourism is working to get accreditation from Eco-Tourism Australia for the remote bungalows to raise the islands’ profile and open up Vanuatu’s eco-tourism credentials to the world. “Working with GGGI has given confidence to Eco-Tourism Australia that these clean energy systems are being developed. With the support from GGGI experts, we can look at achieving more eco-certification by 2017,” says Mr Spooner.

 

Green growth cooperation leads multi-sector growth

As a result of this collaborative approach, the goal of bringing clean energy to remote small tourism operators in Vanuatu while growing the economy is now within reach.  Thomas Nielsen, Policy and Strategy Advisor at GGGI, highlights that working between sectors can lead to greater impact; “this is the whole point of green growth. We’re not just approaching it from an energy angle, we’re looking at it from a development and growth perspective. We know there is an issue attracting tourists to Vanuatu, so we start with this angle to then develop actual green growth across all sectors.”

Achieving 100% renewable energy by 2030 may seem far off, but providing clean electricity to 65% of remote bungalows by then requires a clear pathway and dedicated, collaborative efforts. The partnership between the GoV and GGGI is the first step on the pathway to building thriving local economies, and showing the world Vanuatu’s true, sustainable and remote beauty.

CoverSEOUL – June 20, 2017 – The Global Green Growth Institute today published its 2016 Annual Report, which demonstrates the organization’s results in 2016 to support Member and partner countries to develop green growth planning frameworks and adopt green growth policies that enable increased financing and enhance institutional capacity and knowledge sharing in developing countries and emerging economies.

Two-thousand sixteen included many milestones for GGGI. Building on the momentum of the Paris Agreement and other notable sustainable development initiatives, GGGI re-doubled its effort to deliver green growth and lay the groundwork for transformational change. In 2016, GGGI completed its first biennium Work Program and Budget (WPB) against its Strategic Plan 2015-2020, which focuses on mainstreaming green growth, and developing projects and programs that deliver economic growth that is environmentally sustainable and socially inclusive.

“The work GGGI delivered in 2016, resulted in sound enabling policies, and planning and institutional frameworks that are critical for transformational change toward a path of green growth,” said Dr. Frank Rijsberman, GGGI Director-General.

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In 2016, GGGI facilitated the adoption of 14 green growth policies by partner governments in 10 countries. Working closely with partner governments, GGGI developed green growth strategies and plans and mainstreamed green growth into existing policies and plans.

Backstopped by enabling policies, partner governments initiated the implementation of critical actions to unlock investments needed for green growth. GGGI contributed to the mobilization of USD 105 million in finance from donors to fund green growth activities in Colombia and Ethiopia.

To broker green growth knowledge and learning between countries, GGGI leveraged its experience in strengthening policies to build institutional relationships, partnerships and knowledge networks. In 2016, GGGI contributed to 140 capacity building activities and organized an international conference, the Global Green Growth Week 2016, to forward progress on green finance, project development and green technology solutions.

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“The achievements of 2016, leave no doubt that GGGI is well positioned to address the Sustainable Development Goals and Nationally Determined Contributions priorities of its Members and partners”, add Dr. Frank Rijsberman. “GGGI is now set to demonstrate to stakeholders that it can deliver financial resources to bankable green growth projects and increase impact at scale.”

The official 2016 Annual Report is available online.  The Report webpage includes detailed project by project reporting on each of the 50 programs and projects GGGI delivered during the WPB for 2015-16.

Visit www.report.gggi.org/2016 to learn more.

Read the Key Messages here.

 

About the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI)

Based in Seoul, GGGI is a treaty-based international, inter-governmental organization founded to support and promote green growth. The organization partners with countries to help them build economies that grow strongly, are more efficient and sustainable in the use of natural resources, less carbon intensive, and more resilient to climate change. GGGI works with countries around the world, building their capacity and working collaboratively on green growth policies that can impact the lives of millions. To learn more about GGGI, see http://www.gggi.org and visit us on Facebook and Twitter.

Picture-Signing 2PORT VILA, VANUATU – June 20 – The Hon. Ham Lini Vanuaroroa, Minister for Climate Change Adaptation, Meteorology, Geo-Hazards, Disaster Management Environment and Energy and Dr. Frank Rijsberman, Director General of the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) today signed the Vanuatu Country Planning Framework (CPF) 2017-2021 in Port Vila, Vanuatu.

The CPF is a five year strategic planning document which commits GGGI and the Government of Vanuatu to common goals for green growth. Vanuatu is pursuing a pathway of green growth that underpins the country’s cultural, societal and environmental values. Vanuatu’s National Sustainable Development Plan (NSDP) states that “a more inclusive, equitable, and balanced approach is needed to promote sustainability, eradicate poverty, and enhance well-being and happiness”.

Minister Lini said, “The Vanuatu Government commends GGGI for the strong and effective partnership it has formed in just two years of operation in Vanuatu and already the Government is reaping the benefits through the different programs and projects on the ground. The CPF is a strategic document which provides direction on future interventions of GGGI in Vanuatu in the next five years. The CPF will further strengthen the partnership and will assist the Government to achieve its policy objectives”

Vanuatu became a member of the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) in 2014 and GGGI began its operations in Vanuatu in 2015. From 2015-2016, GGGI supported the Government in its effort to update the National Energy Roadmap (NERM) 2016-2030, develop the National Green Energy Fund (NGEF), and plan for implementing its green energy transition. The National Energy Road Map (NERM) sets targets to achieve 100 percent rural electrification and 100 percent renewable electricity by 2030. Achieving access to reliable, secure and sustainable energy is also a key part of the NSDP.

In signing the CPF, Dr. Frank Rijsberman said, “The CPF is aligned with Vanuatu’s action plans for climate change, the NERM and the NSDP. It is designed to direct strategic support to the Government where it is most needed, maximize value, and promote long term impacts. GGGI looks forward to continuing to work closely with the Government of Vanuatu to meet its energy sector targets”

Given the centrality of energy to achieving green growth in Vanuatu, GGGI and the Government of Vanuatu have committed to jointly implementing the country’s rural electrification targets, as well as promoting renewable energy and energy efficiency for the water, tourism, fisheries and agriculture sectors through the CPF. The CPF for 2017-2021 will be a foundation for GGGI to assist in achieving Vanuatu’s development ambitions and for mobilizing resources.

The joint commitment by GGGI and the Government over the five-year period of this CPF will build on the considerable successes made in Vanuatu over the past decades by ensuring that future energy development is increasingly inclusive and sustainable.

About the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI)

Based in Seoul, GGGI is a treaty-based international, inter-governmental organization founded to support and promote green growth. The organization partners with countries to help them build economies that grow strongly, are more efficient and sustainable in the use of natural resources, less carbon intensive, and more resilient to climate change. GGGI works with countries around the world, building their capacity and working collaboratively on green growth policies that can impact the lives of millions. To learn more about GGGI, see http://www.gggi.org and visit us on Facebook and Twitter.

By Laila Kasuri, GGGI Water Sector Analyst

As someone trained as a water resources engineer, working primarily in water-centric organizations for the last seven years, I am presented with a new, but exciting, challenge at GGGI: to truly be “integrated” by working with the other sectors, but also ensuring that water is never overlooked! At GGGI, our small, but growing water team, is making sure water considerations are streamlined in green growth solutions to avoid any unforeseen externalities.

And what do I mean by externalities?

Let’s use the example of South Asia, which is my home turf. It happens to be a hotspot for water problems, but also home to some amazing “green growth” and environmental thinkers from South Asia, such as Ramchandra Guha. South Asia is an excellent example of how certain solutions, without proper planning, can wreak havoc on natural systems and lead to negative externalities.

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While South Asia’s agricultural economy is one of the largest in the world, ensuring food security for about two billion people, it nevertheless needs significant greening efforts. Despite being home to the largest canal irrigation networks in the world, the region depends heavily on its groundwater aquifers to supply water. Millions of pumps running on either diesel or electricity, are used every day for multiple purposes.

However, in recent years, electricity fluctuation, shortages and load shedding in most villages of South Asia has added to the challenges farmers face by affecting energy – and water – availability. To address this issue a new, “green energy” innovation has emerged: “Solar powered pumps”.

Solar Pumps comprise of a solar panel connected to a water pump

Solar Pumps comprise of a solar panel connected to a water pump

These pumps, instead of running on electricity, run on solar energy, and were even seen as the “harbinger of a new era for water provision”. While the capital costs for installing these pumps can be quite high, these costs are being heavily subsidized by governments in South Asia. In India, schemes are providing 86% subsidy on the capital cost of the pump while the farmer only pays the 14%. Not only that, the operational cost of such pumps is almost negligible as sunlight is free, and the environmental impacts are significantly reduced. Subsidies further allow for this innovation to be accessible to the rural farmer as well as the farmer not connected to the grid. A technological innovation that is green and inclusive! Great, right?

Not entirely. The challenge with any new solution is that we design it to solve a single problem without looking at the other pieces of the picture. Solar pumps are designed to solve the problem of energy, but without the appropriate checks and measures in place, they could lead to additional problems. The almost free cost of solar pumps for farmers means there is no incentive for them to pump less. In fact, this can lead to indiscriminate groundwater pumping, which could threaten the long-term sustainability of aquifers, non-agricultural water uses, and stream–aquifer interactions that sustain riparian ecosystems. What you are left with is ultimately another case of the tragedy of the commons.

Furthermore, current capital subsidies are so large that farmers can choose to overinvest in the capacity of the pumps, choosing an expensive one with higher discharge, even when a surface pump would suffice. These large capital subsidies therefore impose a huge financial burden on both the state and national governments. Such unfortunate and unsustainable financing schemes will lead to inadequate system management and ultimately, failure of the technology itself.

But there are solutions looming as well. IWMI’s leading researchers, including Mr. Tushar Shah have written a great deal about “smart solar pumps”, where a solar power buy-back policy is introduced to encourage farmers to sell excess energy to the grid, incentivizing them to use less for pumping. Farmers will be paid to ‘grow’ solar power and sell it back to the grid rather than use it to pump water, thus making solar power a cash crop. To reap the most benefits, farmers can form “solar farm cooperatives” with a single connection to the grid and sell back and meter the excess power.

Moving from traditional solar pumps to smart solar pumps

Moving from traditional solar pumps to smart solar pumps

This has happened in Dhundi village where the members have formed a cooperative and sold it to the Madhya Gujarat Vidyut Company (MGVCL). Not only has this benefited Dhundi village, but also the MGVCL and the state government, who would otherwise have to provide the village heavily subsidized electricity. These heavy electricity subsidies are common in many parts of India, where they are placing huge economic burdens on the state and federal government.  There is difficult to eliminate them due to fear of farmer backlash. The Dhundi model can offer an alternative of foregoing grid power for solar power with lower capital subsidies but attractive feed-in-tariffs, and at the same time solving the problem of electricity subsidies. Currently, this pilot program is a year old, with data being collected to monitor groundwater and energy use.

For GGGI – and its Water Sector team – this is an exciting opportunity to learn from the IWMI experience, and look at viable solutions that can solve not just one problem, but multiple problems, from increasing energy access and solving the problem of perverse electricity subsidies, to improving the management of water resources and creating incentives for water conservation. In the case

Courtesy The Indian Express: Dhundi Village Solar Co-operative

Courtesy The Indian Express: Dhundi Village Solar Co-operative

of solar powered pumps, there is a huge untapped opportunity for integrated green solutions that can solve not only farmers’ challenges, but the problem of water provision in rural and developing communities not connected to the grid. It requires foresight and strategic planning, from choosing the correct subsidy and the right power supply tariff, to putting in place the institutions that can monitor groundwater extraction and power use. As these solutions are scaled up, the capital costs are likely to go down with mass-produced pumps, thus not requiring huge capital subsidies. This makes such solutions even more viable.

This is certainly an exciting challenge for GGGI – to truly be “integrated” by working across sectors and seeking cross-cutting solutions. Moving forward, it may be necessary to retrain ourselves; instead of solving singular problems of water, of energy, of cities, etc. as many specialists are trained to do, we must work to design solutions that address multiple problems, with the fewest negative externalities. Maybe smart solar pumps are one of them?


LailaLaila Kasuri is a Water Sector Analyst with GGGI’s Investment Policy Solutions Division.

 

resizedAMMAN – May 24, 2017 – The Jordanian Ministry of Environment and the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI), with support from the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature, Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMUB), today published Jordan’s National Green Growth Plan (NGGP).

The NGGP has been under development since January, 2015, and was approved by Jordan’s Cabinet on February 12, 2017.

Aligned with Jordan’s Vision 2025, the NGGP outlines a set of recommendations that will help strengthen the enabling environment for investment and attract national and international finance for green growth over the next 15 years. The NGGP features 24 project concepts across six key green growth sectors, including two business case analyses that demonstrate the economic, social and environmental co-benefits of green growth.

The NGGP Report’s launch was convened under the patronage of H.E Dr.Hani Al-Mulki, Prime Minister of Jordan, with H.E. Dr. Yaseen Khayyat, Minister of Environment of Jordan, providing the opening remarks.

Dr. Khayyat reiterated the importance of collaboration and synergy for achieving impactful and sustainable results, noting that “in light of the economic and environmental challenges facing the Kingdom, the transition to a green economy is one of the most important actions” Jordan can take, and that he was “pleased to offer the NGGP as a set of tools” the entire government can use to implement green growth.

70 stakeholders from various governmental and non-government institutions attended the event.

During the opening ceremony Mr. Jaime Sperberg, from the German embassy on behalf BMUB expressed support for green growth in Jordan, noting that the NGGP is an important step to implementing sustainable growth and its Nationally Determined Contribution to the UNFCCC.

Mr. Per Bertilsson, Assistant Director-General and Head of GGGI’s Green Growth Planning & Implementation Division emphasized GGGI’s commitment to moving from planning to action, and “ensuring the NGGP is well-financed and effectively implemented.”

Following the opening ceremony, a panel discussion took place, facilitated by Mr. Ahmed Al Amra, GGGI Country Representative for Jordan. Several experts discussed next steps, and the roles of the various stakeholders in supporting NGGP implementation.

The closing address was given by H.E Eng. Ahmad Qatarneh, Secretary General of the Ministry of Environment, who summarized the day’s discussions and highlighted the importance of strengthening partnerships between the Ministry of Environment, other ministries, NGOs and international organizations. He also stressed the importance of moving ahead with implementing the recommendations of the National Green Growth Plan and the need for to design cross-sectoral solutions to ensure the desired results.

The evidence, analysis, and recommendations in the NGGP have been drawn from a wide range of sources, including ministries and governmental entities, international agencies, bilateral and multilateral donors, planning and finance experts, NGOs, academia, and private sector groups.

Read more about GGGI’s work in Jordan here.

About the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI)

Based in Seoul, GGGI is a treaty-based international, inter-governmental organization founded to support and promote green growth. The organization partners with countries to help them build economies that grow strongly, are more efficient and sustainable in the use of natural resources, less carbon intensive, and more resilient to climate change. GGGI works with countries around the world, building their capacity and working collaboratively on green growth policies that can impact the lives of millions. To learn more about GGGI, see http://www.gggi.org and visit us on Facebook and Twitter.

re-sizedSEOUL –  May 24, 2017 – The Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) and the KAIST Graduate School of Green Growth signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) today at GGGI’s Seoul headquarters to actively cooperate to pursue joint research projects, sharing of green growth knowledge and best practices, and co-hosting workshops and conferences. The MoU was signed by Dr. Frank Rijsberman, Director-General of GGGI and Dr. Kwangwoo Park, Professor of Finance and Head of the Graduate School of Green Growth at KAIST.

“The MoU we signed today provides a strong basis for the partnership between GGGI and the KAIST Graduate School of Green Growth,” said Dr. Frank Rijsberman, Director-General of GGGI. “I am confident that GGGI and KAIST will achieve synergies by sharing green growth knowledge and best practices, conducting joint research activities as well as organizing joint workshops and conferences to promote green growth in Korea as well as in countries where GGGI operates. The Member countries of GGGI are committed to transform their economies to a new model of green economic growth that is environmentally sustainable and socially inclusive.”

Dr. Kwangwoo Park, Professor of Finance and Head of the Graduate School of Green Growth at KAIST added that, “GGGI and KAIST will work closely together through mutual cooperation to create and share knowledge on green growth and exchange resources, information, ideas and support to achieve a common goal of tackling global climate change.”

About the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI)

Based in Seoul, GGGI is a treaty-based international, inter-governmental organization founded to support and promote green growth. The organization partners with countries to help them build economies that grow strongly, are more efficient and sustainable in the use of natural resources, less carbon intensive, and more resilient to climate change. GGGI works with countries around the world, building their capacity and working collaboratively on green growth policies that can impact the lives of millions. To learn more about GGGI, see http://www.gggi.org and visit us on Facebook and Twitter.

  • Procurement No: RFQ-LPL-2017-0029
  • Issue Date: 24 May 2017
  • RFQ Closing Date: 14 June 2017 – 16:00 KST (Seoul Time) > 19 June 2017 – 16:00 KST (Seoul Time)
  1. RFQ-LPL-2017-0029 Letter of Invitation
  2. RFQ-LPL-2017-0029 Schedule for the RFQ
  3. RFQ-LPL-2017-0029 Instructions on how to submit the Quotation
  4. RFQ-LPL-2017-0029 Term of Reference
  5. RFQ-LPL-2017-0029 Evaluation criteria and method
  6. RFQ-LPL-2017-0029 Technical Standard Forms Part 1
  7. RFQ-LPL-2017-0029 Technical Standard Form Part 2
  8. RFQ-LPL-2017-0029 Financial Standard Form
  9. RFQ-LPL-2017-0029 Contract Draft
  10. General Conditions_ Services Contract
  11. Questions Answers 2017-0029

★ CORRIGENDUM – Invitation to Tenderers

Reference to our procurement notice date 24th May 2017, the tender submission and Closing date has been extended to 19th June 2017.

All other terms & conditions will remain same.

Issued by GGGI Procurement Team.